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December 5, 2011

JIBC releases landmark report on domestic violence prevention and reduction in BC

Report makes the case for primary prevention strategies

Between January 2003 and August 2008, 73 of the 605 homicides committed in BC were the result of domestic violence. In a report titled “Domestic Violence Prevention and Reduction in British Columbia”, Katherine Rossiter reviews domestic violence prevention and reduction initiatives in BC, from 2000-2010, and makes the case for primary prevention strategies that address the root causes of crime and promote strategic investments in children and families.

The review was undertaken to support the work of the Violence Reduction Circle, a collaborative group of researchers, policy makers, clinicians, and service providers, hosted by the Centre for the Prevention & Reduction of Violence (CPRV) within JIBC’s Office of Applied Research. Funding for the study was provided by CPRV through generous donations from the R. Howard Webster Foundation and the British Columbia Institute for Family Violence.

The report, released by JIBC on December 5, notes that British Columbia is one of only a few Canadian provinces without specific domestic or family violence legislation. According to Rossiter, Associate Director, The FREDA Centre for Research on Violence Against Women and Children at Simon Fraser University, “Key decisions pertaining to domestic violence legislation, policy, funding, and services are closely linked to changes in government and high-profile cases of domestic violence and domestic homicide that serve to open policy windows.”

In order to prevent and reduce domestic violence, the report recommends the adoption of a comprehensive domestic violence prevention and reduction plan for BC, and that all levels of government work to bridge gaps in the services and systems designed to protect women and children and to support initiatives that build community capacity to prevent domestic violence.

“This study will serve as a stimulus for ongoing, coordinated efforts to improve frontline practice, curriculum and program development, professional development, policy development, and public education in the area of domestic violence” says Dr. Greg Anderson, JIBC Dean of Applied Research. “It is another significant step towards our goal of making a substantive contribution to the prevention and reduction of violence, supporting those who are called to respond to the suffering of the victims and their families.”

About CPRV

The Centre for the Prevention and Reduction of Violence (CPRV) at JIBC, funded by the R. Howard Webster Foundation and the BC Institute Against Family Violence, supports an applied research program that builds on the experience of frontline practitioners, with a focus on dynamic knowledge creation, translation, and exchange – turning theory into practice and practice into theory. CPRV’s goal is to make a substantive contribution to the prevention and reduction of violence, supporting those who are called to respond to the suffering of those caught in the causes and consequences of violence.

research panel

Katherine Rossiter, author of the Domestic Violence Prevention and Reduction in British Columbia report, and Tracy Porteous, Executive Director, Ending Violence Association of BC, who both spoke at the release of the report on December 5 at JIBC.

Tags: applied research, domestic violence, Kate Rossiter

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Last updated April 4, 2017